Preserving Digital Memories

The older I get, the more obsessed I have become with preserving life’s memories through photos and video. With so many companies offering their storage solutions, we’re living in an age where storage is no longer something that comes at a premium. There are a wide variety of pricing and feature tiers for all, benefiting us as consumers. If you have full trust in the service provider, they are suited particularly well for the majority of consumer needs. But as a consumer, you need to be prepared to shift with potential service changes that may or may not work in your favour.

For many years, I have always been conscious that I’m a photo hoarder and believe that there isn’t a bad photo one can take with the help of advancements in phone camera technology. If you ask any of my work colleagues, they’d probably tell you I have a problem. When we go on any of our socials, I’m the first person to whip out my phone and take pictures as they make nice mementoes to look back on and share.

On a more personal note, during last years Diwali I came to the sudden realisation as we all sat down to my mum belting out her prayers that this will not last forever and it dawned on me that these are truly special moments. Being an Indian who is culturally inept in all the senses and cannot speak his native tongue, I would be comforted knowing that I'll have photos and video to look back on many years to come. From that moment, I decided to make an active effort to capture smaller moments like these. Maybe the pandemic has shown me not take things for granted and appreciate time with family more.

I got a little serious in my crusade and took things a step further by acquiring as many family photos as possible by purchasing a photo scanner to digitise all prints for safekeeping. Prints fade in time, not in the digital world.

Photo Backup Strategy

Whether I take photos on my phone or my FujiFilm X100F camera, the end destination will always be my Synology NAS where I have the following redundancies in place:

  • RAID backup on all hard disks.
  • Nightly backups to the cloud using BackBlaze.
  • Regular backup to an external disk drive and stored off-site.

As expected, my phone gets the most use and everything by default is stored within my Google Photos account using free unlimited storage. I then use Synology Moments that acts as my local Google Photos where my photos are automatically stored to my Synology in original quality.

My camera gets mostly used for when I go on holiday and events. I store the RAW and processed photos on my Synology. I still upload the processed photos to Google Photos as I love its AI search capability and makes sharing easy.

At the end of the day, the layers of redundancy you put in place depend on how important specific photos are to you. I like the idea of controlling my own backups. I take comfort knowing my data is stored in different places:

  • Synology
  • Backblaze
  • Google Photos
  • Offsite Hard Drive

Cloud Storage and Shifting Goalposts

The fear I had pushed to the back of my head finally came to the forefront when Google changed its storage policy.

The recent news regarding the changes in Google Photos service gives me a sense of resolve knowing I already have my local storage solution that is already working in parallel with Google Photos. But I can’t help but feel disappointed by the turn of events though. Even though I can to some extent understand Google's change in their service, I can't help but feel slightly cheated. After all, they offered us all free unlimited storage in exchange to allow them to apply data mining and analysis algorithms to improve their services. That's the price you pay for using a free service. You are the product (this I have no grievances with)!

Now they have enough of our data, they can feel free to cut the cord. We all know Google has a history of just killing products. Google Photos may not be killed, but life has certainly been sucked out of it.

It may come across as if I’m solely bashing Google Photos, when in fact this is a clear example of how companies can change their service conditions for their benefit and face no repercussions. We as users have no say on the matter and just have to roll with the punches. It just seems wrong that a company would entice so many users with a free service to then strip it away. This is a classic monopolistic strategy to grab market share by pricing out its competitors to now demand money from its users.

For me, Google Photos provided a fundamental part of the photo storage experience by making things easily accessible to family and friends. No longer will I be able to invite friends/family to contribute to shared albums unless they opt for the paid plan. Now when you’re surrounded by iPhone users, this creates another barrier of entry.

This has cemented my stance more so to ensure have control of my assets and service, which is something I have been doing.

Final Thoughts

If I have carried out my photo archival process correctly, they should be accessible to future generations for many years to come and continue to live on even after I’ve expired. This should be achievable as I’ll continue to maintain this time-capsule as technology continues to evolve.

The most important take-away: If you strip down my approach to the barebones, I’m not giving in to the monopolistic behaviour of the tech giants - Google, Apple or Microsoft. Just using them as a secondary thought to compliment my process. It’s just my NAS doing the heavy-lifting where I set the rules.

These priceless heirlooms is a legacy and my gift for future generations to come.

Setting A Radio Alarm On A Google Nest Hub: The Long-winded Approach

I love my Google Nest and it truly is a revolutionary piece of kit. Not only does it display my photos but it also forms a key part of some basic smart-home automation. I really have no gripes. But there is one small area I feel it's lacking. The Radio Alarm. I'm the type of person who detests alarm sounds and prefer my sleep cycle to be shattered by something a little softer, like a radio station.

How difficult is it for Google to add a feature that will allow one to wake up to their favourite radio station? I would have thought this key feature would be very easy to put in place, after all, the Nest Hub can carry out much more complex operations. There are varying reports that this feature is available only within the US, which I find very odd to why this is the case. Does Google not know here in the UK we also would find this feature useful?

In the meantime, whilst I await an official release (that may not come anytime soon!) I managed to concoct a somewhat preposterous way to get some form of radio alarm automation. You will require the following:

  • An Android phone with Google Assistant capability
  • Google Nest Hub (standard or max)
  • Phone stand to sit next to your Nest Hub (optional)

The premise of the approach I detail is to get an Android phone to fire off the alarm at the desired time and when the alarm is dismissed manually, the phone will utter a phrase that will be picked up by your Google Nest Hub and play your radio station.

If you’re still here and intrigued by this approach, let's get to it!

The first thing we need to do is set up a “Good Morning” routine on the Google Nest Hub, which can be done through the Google Home app on your phone. It is here where we will carry out the following:

  1. Assistant will section: Adjust media volume to 40%.
  2. And then play section: Select Play radio and enter the name of a radio station.
  3. Save the routine.

Now when you utter the magic phrase “Good morning”, the Google Nest Hub will do exactly what we set up in our routine. Now we need to add some automation to do this for us and this is where the alarm feature on your Android phone comes into play.

I cannot be sure if the alarm feature on all newish Android phones gives the ability to define a Google Assistant routine. If it does, you should see this as an option when setting the alarm. We need to carry out a similar process as we carried out (above) when setting a “Good Morning” routine on the Google Nest Hub:

  1. When I dismiss my alarm: Adjust media volume to 50%.
  2. Select the “Add action” button and under the “Enter command” tab, enter the following text: Hey Google. Good Morning.
  3. Leave the “And then play” section to do nothing.
  4. Save the routine.

Your phone will ideally be placed in close proximity of your Google Nest Hub for the “Hey Google. Good Morning” utterance to be heard. In my case, I have my phone right next to the Nest Hub on my bedside cabinet to make it easy to dismiss the alarm.

I have to concede the approach I have to take comes across quite lame. It just seems ridiculous that you have to rely on a phone to fire off a process to allow one to have the radio to play automatically. Why can’t routines be more flexible at Nest Hub level?

I’m unable to determine whether my approach comes across naive or clever. Maybe it's somewhere in between.

Searching For A New Tablet and Going Back To iPad

I’ve been looking for a tablet for quite some time and doing some in-depth research on the best one to get. I am always a stickler for detail and wanting to get best for the time based on budget and specification.

Only having ever owned two tablets in the past - an iPad 2 and Nexus 7. Being someone who has semented himself in the Android/Google ecosystem, I automatically got along with the Nexus and quickly became my daily driver for web browsing and reading the vast variety of books from Amazon and Google Books. That was 5-6 years ago. The tablet game has changed... No longer is it just about viewing information, watching videos with some minor swipe gestures and basic gaming. It’s more!

Ever since Microsoft released the first version of their Surface tablet computer, it shifted the industry standards to what we should now expect from a tablet, which then led to more innovation such as:

  • Keyboard support
  • Writing with palm rejection (not that old school stylus from yesteryear!)
  • Multitasking with the ability to view multiple apps in one screen, which is only getting better by the day!
  • Near laptop replacement - We’ll go into this a little later

I wasn’t so quick to jump on the new iterations of tablets entering the market as I was waiting to see the proof in the pudding and for prices to go down. I just don’t think its worth spending over £600 on a tablet - looking at you iPad Pro! Nevertheless, from initially piquing my interest, it now got my full attention. For the first in a long time, I could see how having a tablet be useful in my day to day activities again.

Do I Really Need A Tablet?

Short answer: Yes.

If you asked me this question last year I would have more than likely have said no. My Pixel 2 smartphone fit the bill for for my portable needs. Tablet life was soon being relegated to just holidays and long weekends away.

The only thing that has changed is the increased amount of blogging and writing I now do. Typing on a smartphone really made my thumbs tired for long periods of time for when I didn’t have a computer to hand. On the other hand, I found lugging around my MacBook Pro 15" just for writing was a little excessive and lacking all day battery life.

I could see myself buying a tablet along with a Bluetooth keyboard for easy quick note taking for when going to conferences and for writing something a little more indepth. For anyone who writes, they will probably tell you when you have a sudden spark of inspiration you need to just write it down.

Conundrum: To Android or Not To Android

There seems to be a real lack of good Android tablets going around that has good build quality, vanilla OS with accessories to match. It’s guaranteed that if you go for an Android tablet, you’ll be subjected to inferior cheap cases and hardware. This was indeed the case when looking for a nice flip case for my old Nexus 7.

One would be forgiven for being given the impression accessory manufacturers don’t give Android tablets the light of day - very annoying. I still love the nice leather Kavaj case I purchased soon after getting my iPad 2. My iPad 2 may not be getting used, but still looks the part resting on the bookshelf! I guess it’s understandable why accessory manufacturers are not providing the goods for where there is limited demand. It all comes down to a lack of flagship Android devices and I was hoping the Pixel Slate would change this. Not a chance! I really wanted to go for the Pixel Slate but the main unknown factor for me is the longevity of a device that starts at £749.

The only choice was to consider an iPad.

What About The Microsoft Surface?

The Microsoft Surface is a computer powerhouse and if I needed another laptop, this would have been a great purchase. I look forward to owining one in the future. Again, it all comes down to price. You have to take into consideration the cost of the computer itself as well as the added type cover. Plus I feared I would be greeted with a long Windows Update when I have a sudden spark of writing inspiration.

Choosing An iPad

Apple’s have positioned their iPad lineup that should meet all demand:

I opted for the iPad Air for the 10.5” screen, A12 Bionic processor and Smart connector. The Smart connector was something previously available to the Pro series only and it was a welcome addition to their mid range tablet as this will give me the ability to connect a keyboard cover and any further peripherals that maybe on the horizon. Future proof!

The performance and multi-tasking support is pretty good as well. I am writing this very post with Evernote in one window, Chrome in another whilst listening to Spotify.

Near Laptop Replacement and iPad OS

I have no expectation to make the iPad a laptop replacement. But it’s the nearest experience to it. In all honesty, I don’t understand how some even find the iPad Pro a complete replacement. Would someone enlighten me?

I found using Jump Desktop to remote onto my laptop a really good way to get a laptop experience on my iPad. Very useful when I need to use applications I’d never be able to run on a tablet like VMWare. Jump Desktop is one of the best remote desktop applications you can use on an iPad.

Jump Desktop features one of the fastest RDP rendering engines on the planet. Built in-house and hand tuned for high performance on mobile devices. Jump’s RDP engine also supports audio streaming, printer and folder sharing, multi-monitors, touch redirection, RD Gateway and international keyboards.

I am really looking forward to the release of iPad OS as it might lead to a more immersive experience that bridges the gap closer to the basic features we expect from a laptop. I always felt iOS still lacks some of features currently present in Android, such as widgets to see app activity at a glance and more control over your files.

Conclusion

If you’re looking for a tablet that has the capability to do a lot of wonderful things with a lot of nice supported accessories, you can’t go wrong with an iPad Air.

Update (21/06/2019): Android Abandoning The Tablet Market

Well this totally caught me off guard. The Verge reported on 20th June that Android are exiting the tablet market and concentrating their efforts on building laptops. This further validates my purchase and choosing an iPad was indeed the right decision.

Duplicate Content: The Impact of Canonical URLs

Being a web developer I am trying to become savvier when it comes to factoring additional SEO practices, which is generally considered (in my view) compulsory.

Ever since Google updated its Search Console (formally known as Webmaster Tools), it has opened my eyes to how my site is performing in greater detail, especially the pages Google deems as links not worthy for indexing. I started becoming more aware of this last August, when I wrote a post about attempting to reduce the number "Crawled - Currently not indexed" pages of my site. Through trial and error managed to find a way to reduce the excluded number of page links.

The area I have now become fixated on is the sheer number of pages being classed as "Duplicate without user-selected canonical". Google describes these pages as:

This page has duplicates, none of which is marked canonical. We think this page is not the canonical one. You should explicitly mark the canonical for this page. Inspecting this URL should show the Google-selected canonical URL.

In simplistic terms, Google has detected there are pages that can be accessed by different URL's with either same or similar content. In my case, this is the result of many years of unintentional neglect whilst migrating my site through different platforms and URL structures during the infancy of my online presence.

Google Search Console has marked around 240 links as duplicates due to the following two reasons:

  1. Pages can be accessed with or without a ".aspx" extension.
  2. Paginated content.

I was surprised to see paginated content was classed as duplicate content, as I was always under the impression that this would never be the case. After all, the listed content is different and I have ensured that the page titles are different for when content is filtered by either category or tag. However, if a site consists of duplicate or similar content, it is considered a negative in the eyes of a search engine.

Two weeks ago I added canonical tagging across my site, as I was intrigued to see if there would be any considerable change towards how Google crawls my site. Would it make my site easier to crawl and aid Google in understanding the page structure?

Surprising Outcome

I think I was quite naive about how my Search Console Coverage statistics would shift post cononicalisation. I was just expecting the number of pages classed as "Duplicate without user-selected canonical" to decrease, which was the case. I wasn't expecting anything more. On further investigation, it was interesting to see an overall positive change across all other coverage areas.

Here's the full breakdown:

  • Duplicate without user-selected canonical: Reduced by 10 pages
  • Crawled - Currently not indexed: Reduced by 65 pages
  • Crawl anomaly: Reduced by 20 pages
  • Valid : Increased by 60 pages

The change in figures may not look that impressive, but we have to remember this report is based only on two weeks after implementing canonical tags. All positives so far and I'm expecting to see further improvements over the coming weeks.

Conclusion

Canonical markup can often be overlooked, both in its implementation and importance when it comes to SEO. After all, I still see sites that don't use them as the emphasis is placed on other areas that require more effort to ensure it meets Google's search criteria, such as building for mobile, structured data and performance. So it's understandable why canonical tags could be missed.

If you are in a similar position to me, where you are adding canonical markup to an existing site, it's really important to spend the time to set the original source page URL correctly the first time as the incorrect implementation can lead to issues.

Even though my Search Console stats have improved, the jury's still out to whether this translates to better site visibility across search engines. But anything that helps search engines and visitors understand your content source can only be beneficial.

Reducing The Number of 'Crawled - Currently not indexed' Pages

Every few weeks, I check over the health of my site through Google Search Console (aka Webmaster Tools) and Analytics to see how Google is indexing my site and look into potential issues that could affect the click-through rate.

Over the years the content of my site has grown steadily and as it stands it consists of 250 published blog posts. When you take into consideration other potential pages Google indexes - consisting of filter URL's based on grouping posts by tag or category, the number of links that my site consists is increased considerably. It's to the discretion of Google's search algorithm to whether it includes these links for indexing.

Last month, I decided to scrutinise the Search Console Index Coverage report in great detail just to see if there are any improvements I can make to alleviate some minor issues. What I wasn't expecting to see is the large volume of links marked as "Crawled - Currently not indexed".

Crawled Currently Not Indexed - 225 Pages

Wow! 225 affected pages! What does "Crawled - Currently not indexed" mean? According to Google:

The page was crawled by Google, but not indexed. It may or may not be indexed in the future; no need to resubmit this URL for crawling.

Pretty self-explanatory but not much guidance on the process on how to lessen the number of links that aren't indexed. From my experience, the best place to start is to look at the list of links that are being excluded and to form a judgement based on the page content of these links. Unfortunately, there isn't an exact science. It's a process of trial and error.

Let's take a look at the links from my own 225 excluded pages:

Crawled Currently Not Indexed - Non Indexed Links

On initial look, I could see that the majority of the URL's consisted of links where users can filter posts by either category or tag. I could see nothing content-wise when inspecting these pages for a conclusive reason for index exclusion. However, what I did notice is that these links were automatically found by Google when the site gets spidered. The sitemap I submitted in the Search Console only list out blog posts and content pages.

This led me to believe a possible solution would be to create a separate sitemap that consisted purely of links for these categories and tags. I called it metasitemap.xml. Whenever I added a post, the sitemap's "lastmod" date would get updated, just like the pages listed in the default sitemap.

I created and submitted this new sitemap around mid-July and it wasn't until four days ago the improvement was reported from within the Search Console. The number of non-indexed pages was reduced to 58. That's a 74% reduction!

Crawled Currently Not Indexed - 58 Pages

Conclusion

As I stated above, there isn't an exact science for reducing the number of non-indexed pages as every site is different. Supplementing my site with an additional sitemap just happened to alleviate my issue. But that is not to say copying this approach won't help you. Just ensure you look into the list of excluded links for any patterns.

I still have some work to do and the next thing on my list is to implement canonical tags in all my pages since I have become aware I have duplicate content on different URL's - remnants to when I moved blogging platform.

If anyone has any other suggestions or solutions that worked for them, please leave a comment.

Google Seems To Have An Issue With My Server Response Time...

...and I think I know why...

Out of all the issues Google PageSpeed Insights seems to have when analysing my site, there are two specific things crop up that annoy me:

  1. ​Reduce server response time
  2. ​Leverage browser caching (due to Google Analytics JavaScript file)

The Google Analytics issue is something I will have to live with since (as far as I'm aware) there's nothing I can do. It would be nice if Google wouldn't penalise you for using a product they have developed. However, the "Reduce server response time" was something that perplexed me. My site is relatively simple and not doing anything over-the-top.

Due to the nature of my hosting setup (shared), I didn't have all the capabilities to make my website respond any better. The only way I could think of improving server response time was to move my hosting to another region and purchasing a VPS to get more control.

Now, I think I have resolved the server response time issue...It has something to do with a Web Statistics service called AWStats that was enabled by default as an "addon" service on my hosting. Once disabled through my Plesk Management Portal, Google PageSpeed didn't seem to have any issue with my server response.

I cannot 100% confirm if by disabling the Web Statistics service is a permanent solution and will work for everyone else. But there might be some truth behind this. Web Statistic services like AWStats store all analytical data in log files directly on the server, so this must have some affect on the time a request is made. I could be talking complete nonesense.

If you have experienced the same problem as me, check your own hosting setup and it's "addon" services. You never know, it may give you that extra Google PageSpeed point. :-)

Official Google Nexus 7 (2013) Case Review

Nexus 7 Case Google LabelEver since I purchased my Nexus 7 last year. I've been trying to find a nice case for it. Failing, I settled for a cheap and cheerful folio case from eBay, which (still to this day) has served me well. But I was dying to have a case that looked different and oozed some unique design elements.

When I noticed Google selling their own collection of Nexus 5 and 7 cases, I purchased one straight away. The Grey/Blue colour scheme caught my eye. It seemed that Google's offering ticked all the boxes. What could they possibly do wrong? It's an official product designed and manufactured by the very people who made the Nexus 7. If anyone could make a case without fault, it would have to be Google....right?

Sadly no.

For starters, the case lacks magnet technology allowing automatic power on/off feature when opening the case. Secondly, there was no type of latch that would keep the case closed and found that the case opened whilst it was moving around in my backpack. Maybe I just had high expectations since my current offering already had these features.

Yes. These might be small things. But I found myself getting increasingly agitated (maybe an overstatement!) whilst using my Nexus 7, especially for a case that cost four times the price of the case I previously used.

Nexus 7 Case - Outside

Nexus 7 Case - Inside

It wasn't all doom and gloom. There were things I did like about Google's case offering. I loved that the case looked and felt very different to what is available on the market currently. Outside was covered with hard wearing fabric with an inner lining of suede. Definitely high quality stuff!

Unfortunately, Google just seemed to miss the mark by not including a few key features, mainly being the magnetic sensor.

Back to Google it goes.

Update - 11/02/2014

I was expecting to pay for all postage costs to return the case. But after contacting Google Support regarding the reasons to why I wanted to return the item, they sent me a prepaid shipping package and were very helpful throughout the return process. Quick and easy!

Integrating Into Google Plus - Is it worth it?

Google Plus When I first heard Google were introducing their own social-networking platform, I was intrigued to say the least on what they could offer compared to the other social sites I use: Facebook and Twitter.

As I stated in one of my earlier posts, I am more of a tweeter since I can share my blog posts easily along with my random ramblings. I think Facebook will have a problem competing alongside Twitter or Google+. Facebook is seen to be more of a personal social network rather than a open professional network and that’s its biggest downfall. It’s quite difficult to cross the boundaries between posting professional/business content alongside personal posts. Thankfully, this is something Google Plus does quite well through its new “circle’s” feature allowing complete control on who see’s what.

I jumped at the chance of using Google Plus when I was offered an invite during the initial release. I was very impressed. Simple and straight-forward. My posts looked really beautiful within its minimalist user interface. Well what else would you expect from Google? Don’t get me started on the eye-sore that is Facebook’s new interface – I’ll leave that for another blog post.

For me, Google Plus is like an extension of Twitter with some added benefits such as:

  • Ability to make posts private/public.
  • Follow people by adding them to a circle.
  • No character limit on the length of posts.
  • Nice interoperability with the search-daddy that is Google.

For a new social networking site, I get a higher click-through-rate to my blog than I ever got compared to tweeting on Twitter. In the process, I managed to get more people adding me to their circle. So take any remarks regarding the inactivity of Google+ with a pinch of salt. I don’t buy it. Google encompasses a big community that you feel part of.

I briefly touched upon the interoperability factor with Google search. People underestimate the power of having the backing of Google search. For example, what if you wrote an article and linked it to your Google+ profile? This information will be displayed as author information within search results to help users discover great content and learn more about the person who wrote the article.

One thing that did surprise me is the fact that at this point in time there’s no advertisement. Unlike its predecessors (yes I that’s how confident I am in Google Plus), you always manage to find advertisement in some form or another. I can view my profile page without constantly having an advert rubbing my single relationship status to my face – something Facebook does far too often.

I trust Google more with my data over Facebook any day. I know Google can’t exactly be trusted either but unlike Facebook they’re not always in the the news on a monthly basis regarding some type of data scandal. At time of writing, it is being reported Facebook is now facing a privacy suit over internet tracking.

In conclusion, integrating ones self into Google Plus is definitely worth it. I only recently started to make more of an effort on Google+ and I find myself posting my content here over other social-networking sites. The key to making a good start is to make some of your posts public to show others your interests and even connect to these type of people either by adding them to a circle or joining a hangout.

On a final note, if you have a Google Plus account and like what I post then why not circle me. :-)

Backing up Google Account Data

In light of what has happened recently with some 150,000 Google Account holders loosing their information due to a mishap at Google HQ over the weekend really reinforces the fact that our data is not safe…even in the “cloud”.

At the end of the day our information is stored on hardware that can fail. I think that this whole “cloud computing” malarkey has got all lured into a false sense of security where we think we don’t need to take measures to ensure our data backed up on a regular basis. I have to admit, I too have become a bit tardy when it comes to backing up my online data. If a large company like Google can get it wrong, what hope is there for other companies offering the same thing?

I practically live on the “cloud” in terms of what Google has to offer. I use their email, calendar, document and notebook applications. Even their mobile phone OS: Android! Luckily, there are steps we can take to ensure our data is backed up on your own terms:

Google Calendar Google Calendar

Google Calendar is the one application I use the most. If I lost all my data, I would quite annoyed to say the least (and be very disorganised).

You can backup all your calendar entries by opening your calendar settings, click on Calendars and select “Export Calendars”. A zip file will be created containing your calendars in a .ical format.
 
GmailLogo Gmail

This a simple one. Use an desktop email client such as Thunderbird (or any other client you prefer) to download all your emails directly to you computer through POP access.
 
GoogleDocsLogo Docs

If you only store a handful of documents in your Google Account, you could just download them one-by-one. Understandably, if you have a long list of documents a more automated approach is required.

Lifehacker.com shows a really great script you can use to that allows you to download documents in whatever format you require. Take a look here.
 

Hooray! Our data is saved!

The Google Chrome Comic Strip

I have to say that I am quite impressed with the way Google markets its own applications and services. Who would ever had thought of using a comic string to introduce the key workings of a specific application? Its a lengthy comic to say the least, consisting of 38 “fun filled” pages, which actually makes learning about the Chrome browser an interesting read.

Google Chrome Comic 1

Google Chrome Comic 2

But this does ask the question on why Google is releasing their own browser? I thought they had extended their search deal with Mozilla Firefox in return for setting Google as the default search engine. I guess this may cause an awkward relationship between the two in the future. But I suppose any attack against the dreaded Microsoft Internet Explorer browser can only be a benefit!

I have to say that the guy wearing the glasses on the left bares a striking (less cool) resemblance to me. :-)

You can view the full comic strip here.