Calculate Time Duration in Seconds, Minutes, Hours & Weeks

For a news site I am currently working on, I needed to display the last time a news article was last published. I wanted to be able to show the duration based on respective major time format. For example, if an article was displayed a couple hours ago, I would want it to to display “2 hours” not “120 minutes”.

More importantly, if an article hadn’t been published to the site more than a week, I don’t want the exact time duration to be displayed. I would prefer the following message: “more than a week ago”. This way, if the site administrator gets really lazy the website viewer will not know the exact time period the site was last updated.

Code:

public class TimePassed
{
    public static string GetPassedTime(DateTime since)
    {
        TimeSpan ts = DateTime.Now.Subtract(since);

        if (ts.Days <= 7)
        {
            switch (ts.Days)
            {
                case 0:
                    switch (ts.Hours)
                    {
                        case 0:
                            switch (ts.Minutes)
                            {
                                case 0:
                                    return String.Format("{0} seconds ago", ts.Seconds);
                                case 1:
                                    return "1 minute ago";
                                default:
                                    return String.Format("{0} minutes ago", ts.Minutes);
                            }
                        case 1:
                            return "1 hour ago";
                        default:
                            return String.Format("{0} hours ago", ts.Hours);
                    }
                case 1:
                    return "yesterday";
                default:
                    return String.Format("{0} days ago", ts.Days);
            }
        }
        else
        {
            return "more than a week ago";
        }
    }
}

Get CheckBoxList Values Using jQuery

To be able to retrieve values from a ASP.NET CheckBoxList control or a group of HTML checkboxes, use the following jQuery:

$(document).ready(function () {
    var checkboxValues = [];

    $('#<%=MyCheckBoxList.ClientID %> input[type=checkbox]').click(function () {
        $('input[type=checkbox]:checked').each(function () {
            checkboxValues.push(this.value);
        });        
    });
    
    var values = checkboxValues.toString(); //Output Format: 1,2,3
});

If you do use this code snippet on a CheckBoxList, take a look that this article on how to create a custom CheckBoxList control with a value attribute.

ASP.NET CheckBoxList Control With Value Attribute

ASP.NET server controls is a great way to quickly build a page with dynamic functionality. Even though we do not have much of direct control over the way these controls are rendered, they do a pretty good job and its not very often I get annoyed with them.

Until now.

Generally, I find myself using the .Attributes.Add() method when needing to add additional attributes to certain server controls. No problem! In this case, I wanted to add a “value” attribute that will contain the record ID for that checkbox. I can then use this value within my JavaScript. I would have thought a value attribute would already be there. Its perfectly valid HTML mark-up:

<form>
    <input type="checkbox" name="vehicle" value="Volvo" />
    <input type="checkbox" name="vehicle" value="Volkswagen" />
</form> 

For some reason, when I tried to add my custom attributes after my CheckBoxList was databound (as shown below), the attribute was simply ignored.

NewsCheckList.Items[0].Attributes["value"] = "1";
NewsCheckList.Items[1].Attributes["value"] = "2";
NewsCheckList.Items[2].Attributes["value"] = "3";

So I decided the best way forward would be to create a custom CheckBoxList control that would contain a value attribute. I based my code from an old (but very useful) article that can be found here.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Web.UI.WebControls;
using System.IO;
using System.Web.UI;
using System.Collections;
using System.ComponentModel;

namespace Site.WebControls
{
    [DefaultProperty("Text"),
    ToolboxData("<{0}:CheckBoxValueList runat=server></{0}:CheckBoxValueList>")]
    public class CheckBoxValueList : CheckBoxList
    {
        protected override void Render(HtmlTextWriter writer)
        {
            StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
            TextWriter tw = new StringWriter(sb);
            
            HtmlTextWriter originalStream = new HtmlTextWriter(tw);
            base.Render(originalStream);
            string renderedText = sb.ToString();

            int start = 0;
            int labelStart = 0;
            int end = renderedText.Length;

            for (int i = 0; i < this.Items.Count; i++)
            {
                StringBuilder itemAttributeBuilder = new StringBuilder();

                end = renderedText.Length;
                start = renderedText.IndexOf("<input", start, end - start);
                labelStart = renderedText.IndexOf("<label", start, end - start);

                this.Items[i].Attributes.Render(new HtmlTextWriter(new StringWriter(itemAttributeBuilder)));

                renderedText = renderedText.Insert(labelStart + 7, itemAttributeBuilder.ToString() + " ");
                renderedText = renderedText.Insert(start + 7, String.Format("{0} value=\"{1}\" ", itemAttributeBuilder.ToString(), this.Items[i].Value));
                start = renderedText.IndexOf("/>", start, renderedText.Length - start);
            }
            
            writer.Write(renderedText);
        }
    }
}

XmlDocument.Load Error Handling

From one of the projects I have been working on, I came across a snippet of code that used the XmlDocument.Load method. What alarmed me about this piece of code was the fact that there was no error handling. If for some reason the XML file could not be found or a node was missing, the whole page would have crashed. Not good.

I must admit, I am not exactly the best person to speak about implementing wide-scale error handling in every facet of code. But I do ensure the core foundations of an application or website do incorporate sufficient error handling.

So back to the matter in hand. This is the original code using the XmlDocument.Load functionality:

XmlDocument doc = new XmlDocument();

doc.Load(Server.MapPath("/xml/storeGB.xml"));

XmlNode countryNode = doc.SelectSingleNode("//countries");
foreach (XmlNode node in countryNode.ChildNodes)
{
    //Do something with the elements
    Response.Write(node.Name + node.InnerText);
}

I changed the code to the following:

XmlDocument doc = new XmlDocument();

//Check if language XML file exists
if (File.Exists(Server.MapPath("/xml/storeGB.xml")))
{
    try
    {
        doc.Load(Server.MapPath("/xml/storeGB.xml"));

        XmlNode countryNode = doc.SelectSingleNode("//countries");

        if (countryNode != null)
        {
            foreach (XmlNode node in countryNode.ChildNodes)
            {
                //Do something with the elements
                Response.Write(node.Name + node.InnerText);
            }
        }
        else
        {
            //Output error message if there is no node
        }
    }
    catch (XmlException ex)
    {
        Debug.WriteLine(String.Format("XmlException for countries: {0}", ex.Message));
    }
}

I am sure you will agree that this is the better approach to using XmlDocument.Load.

At Last! Created My Own eBay Style Search Using Solrnet

Over the last few months I have been carrying out endless amounts of research and development to find a way to create my own eCommerce styled search similar to the likes of what eBay and Amazon use. Otherwise known as “Faceted Search”, whereby the search results are filtered through a series of facets belonging to your search criteria. Each facet typically corresponds to the possible values of a property common to a set of objects.

Sounds very difficult and complex doesn’t it! Smile Even to this very day, I am sure eBay and Amazon must use some kind of “magic” to get their search to work in a seamlessly and efficient format.

There are numerous search solutions out there that could help you achieve in making this type of search. From my experience I couldn’t find any low cost out-of-the-box solutions that would help me in making my own search. Majority of the search vendors were not only very expensive but they also required a quote to tailor make a solution for you.

In the early stages I tried expanding my Lucene.NET knowledge, but I couldn’t find a flexible way to introduce facets into my search. I must admit I am not exactly an expert in Lucene and this could have also had a part to play in failing miserably.

When I thought all was lost and there was no chance in hell in being able to figure this thing out, I luckily came across a few blog and StackOverflow posts by a guy called Mauricio Scheffer. Mauricio seems to be the brains behind the .NET client version of a search platform called: SolrNet. SolrNet is a  Solr client library built for the .NET Framework. This is one of the strengths of Solr. It can be consumed within other development platforms such as Python and Ruby.

SolrNet just happened to be an ideal solution to what I was looking for and with just over a weeks development I was able to build my own basic search, which looks something like this:

SolrNet1 SolrNet2

As you can see from my screenshots, you can carry out a search by report type and/or global text search. In addition, the showing and hiding of the facet objects are purely dependent on the searches returned.

SolrNet is a very flexible package and I know just enough to implement the basics. But I was really surprised on how well the searches performed even with the most basic implementation. So I am looking forward to adding additional features as over the next few months and perfecting both my Solr search index and code.

I won’t be posting the code that I used to create my search since its quite a big project and tailor made specific to my database architecture. But here are a few links that I found useful to get me started in the world of SolrNet:

Multi Query Search Using Lucene.NET

Over the last few days I have been doing some research on the best way to implement search functionality for a site I am currently building. The site will consists mainly of news articles. The client wanted a search that would allow a user to search across all fields that related to a news article.

Originally, I envisaged writing my own SQL to query a few tables within my database to return some search results. But as I delved further into designing the database architecture in the early planning stages, I found that my original (somewhat closed minded) approach wouldn't be flexible nor scalable enough to search and extract all the information I required.

From what I have researched, the general consensus is to either use SQL Full Text Search or Lucene.NET. Many have favoured the use of Lucene due to its richer querying language and generally more flexible since you have the ability to write a search index tailored to your project. From what I gather, Lucene can work with any type of text data. For example, you not only can index rows in your database but there are also solutions to support indexing physical files in your application. Neat!

I have written some basic code (below) with a couple methods to get started in creating a search index and carrying out a multi-query search across your whole index. You would further enhance this code to only carry out a full index once all required records have been added. Most implementations of Lucene would use incremental indexing, where documents already in the index are just updated individually, rather than deleting the whole index and building a new one every time. I plan to hook up and optimise my Lucene code into a service that would be scheduled to carry out an incremental index every midnight.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using Lucene;
using Lucene.Net;
using Lucene.Net.Store;
using Lucene.Net.Analysis;
using Lucene.Net.Analysis.Standard;
using Lucene.Net.Index;
using Lucene.Net.Documents;
using Lucene.Net.QueryParsers;
using Lucene.Net.Search;
using System.Configuration; 

namespace MES.DataManager.Search
{
    public class Lucene
    {
        public static void IndexSite()
        {           
                //The file location of the index
                string indexLocation = @ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["SearchIndexPath"];

                Directory searchDirectory = null;

                if (System.IO.Directory.Exists(indexLocation))
                    searchDirectory = FSDirectory.GetDirectory(indexLocation, false);
                else
                    searchDirectory = FSDirectory.GetDirectory(indexLocation, true); 

                //Create an analyzer to process the text
                Analyzer searchAnalyser = new StandardAnalyzer(); 

                //Create the index writer with the directory and analyzer.
                IndexWriter indexWriter = new IndexWriter(searchDirectory, searchAnalyser, true);

                //Iterate through Article table and populate the index
                foreach (Article a in ArticleBLL.GetArticleDetails())
                {
                    Document doc = new Document();

                    doc.Add(new Field("id", a.ID.ToString(), Field.Store.YES, Field.Index.UN_TOKENIZED, Field.TermVector.YES));
                    doc.Add(new Field("title", a.Title, Field.Store.YES, Field.Index.TOKENIZED, Field.TermVector.YES));
                    doc.Add(new Field("articletype", a.Type.TypeName, Field.Store.YES, Field.Index.TOKENIZED, Field.TermVector.YES)); 

                    if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(a.Summary))
                        doc.Add(new Field("summary", a.Summary, Field.Store.YES, Field.Index.TOKENIZED, Field.TermVector.YES));                

                    if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(a.ByLineShort))
                        doc.Add(new Field("bylineshort", a.ByLineShort, Field.Store.YES, Field.Index.TOKENIZED, Field.TermVector.YES));                    

                    if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(a.ByLineLong))
                        doc.Add(new Field("bylinelong", a.ByLineLong, Field.Store.YES, Field.Index.TOKENIZED, Field.TermVector.YES));                   

                    if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(a.BasicWords))
                        doc.Add(new Field("basicwords", a.BasicWords, Field.Store.YES, Field.Index.TOKENIZED, Field.TermVector.YES));                   

                    if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(a.MediumWords))
                        doc.Add(new Field("mediumwords", a.MediumWords, Field.Store.YES, Field.Index.TOKENIZED, Field.TermVector.YES));                   

                    if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(a.LongWords))
                        doc.Add(new Field("longwords", a.LongWords, Field.Store.YES, Field.Index.TOKENIZED, Field.TermVector.YES));  

                    //Write the document to the index
                    indexWriter.AddDocument(doc);
                }
                          

                //Optimize and close the writer
                indexWriter.Optimize();
                indexWriter.Close();         
        }

        public static List<CoreArticleDetail> SearchArticles(string searchTerm)
        {
            Analyzer analyzer = new StandardAnalyzer(); 

            //Search by multiple fields
            MultiFieldQueryParser parser = new MultiFieldQueryParser(
                                                                new string[]
                                                                {
                                                                    "title",
                                                                    "summary",
                                                                    "bylineshort",
                                                                    "bylinelong",
                                                                    "basicwords",
                                                                    "mediumwords",
                                                                    "longwords"
                                                                },
                                                                analyzer); 

            Query query = parser.Parse(searchTerm); 

            //Create an index searcher that will perform the search
            IndexSearcher searcher = new IndexSearcher(@ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["SearchIndexPath"]); 

            //Execute the query
            Hits hits = searcher.Search(query);

            List<int> articleIDs = new List<int>(); 

            //Iterate through index and return all article id’s
            for (int i = 0; i < hits.Length(); i++)
            {
                Document doc = hits.Doc(i);

                articleIDs.Add(int.Parse(doc.Get("id")));
            } 

            return ArticleBLL.GetArticleSearchInformation(articleIDs);
        }

    }
}

As you can see, my example allows you to carry out a search across as many of your fields as you require which I am sure you will find useful. It took a lot of research to find out how to carry out a multi query search. Majority of the examples I found over the internet showed you how to search only one field.

The main advantage I can see straight away from using Lucene is that since the search data is held on disk, there is hardly any need to query the database. The only downside I can see is problems being caused by the possibility a corrupt index.

For more information on using Lucene, here are a couple of links that you may find useful to get started (I know I did):

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/library/IntroducingLucene.aspx http://ifdefined.com/blog/post/Full-Text-Search-in-ASPNET-using-LuceneNET.aspx

Watermarking Images On The Fly Using ASP.NET

Watermarking and general image manipulation within the .NET Framework has become quite an easy thing to carry out thanks to the features provided by the System.Drawing namespace. The System.Drawing namespace contains types to help you with…well…drawing and rendering images. I will not be covering the basic use of the System.Drawing class. But feel free to carry out a Google.

My example consists of using a .NET (aspx) page and a Generic Handler (ashx). The .NET page will allow me to select an image, add a logo to the top left and some text. The Generic Handler will contain all the magic needed to manipulate the image based on selections made within the .NET page. The screenshot (below) shows my basic program in action.

Image Watermarking

Firstly, let me start off by showing you the code for the Generic Handler.

ImageRenderJpeg.ashx

using System;
using System.Web;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Drawing.Imaging;
using System.Drawing.Drawing2D;

public class ImageRenderJpeg : IHttpHandler
{
    public void ProcessRequest(HttpContext context)
    {
        context.Response.ContentType = "image/jpeg";

        //Retrieve image details
        string imageUrl = context.Request.QueryString["ImageUrl"].ToString();
        string imageComment = context.Request.QueryString["ImageComment"].ToString();
        string imageIconUrl = context.Request.QueryString["Icon"].ToString();

        if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(imageUrl))
        {
            //Get the location of the image
            Image imagePhoto = Image.FromFile(imageUrl);

            // Get dimensions of image
            int imageHeight = imagePhoto.Height;
            int imageWidth = imagePhoto.Width;

            //Create a new Bitmap
            Bitmap oBitmap = new Bitmap(imageWidth, imageHeight, PixelFormat.Format24bppRgb);

            //Load Background Graphic from Image
            Graphics oGraphics = Graphics.FromImage(oBitmap);
            oGraphics.SmoothingMode = SmoothingMode.HighQuality;
            oGraphics.DrawImage(imagePhoto, new Rectangle(0, 0, imageWidth, imageHeight), 0, 0, imageWidth, imageHeight, GraphicsUnit.Pixel);

            //Layer 1: Add an Image Logo to the top left
            if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(imageIconUrl))
            {
                Image imageIcon = Image.FromFile(imageIconUrl);
                oGraphics.DrawImage(imageIcon, new Rectangle(5, 5, 124, 48), 0, 0, imageIcon.Width, imageIcon.Height, GraphicsUnit.Pixel);

                imageIcon.Dispose();
            }
            
            //Layer 2: Add Comment
            if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(imageComment))
            {
                Font commentFont = new Font("Arial", 14, FontStyle.Regular); //Font Style
                StringFormat commentFormat = new StringFormat();
                commentFormat.Alignment = StringAlignment.Near; //Align text in left of layer

                SolidBrush commentBrush = new SolidBrush(Color.Black); //Font Colour

                oGraphics.FillRectangle(Brushes.Beige, 5, imageHeight - 55, imageWidth - 15, 50); //Create a rectangle with white background
                oGraphics.DrawString(imageComment, commentFont, commentBrush, new Rectangle(5, imageHeight - 55, imageWidth - 15, 50), commentFormat); //Add comment text inside rectangle
            }
            
            //Layer 3: Add Copyright watermark
            Font watermarkFont = new Font("Arial", 40, FontStyle.Bold); //Font Style
            SolidBrush semiTransBrush = new SolidBrush(Color.LightGray); //Font Colour
            StringFormat watermarkFormat = new StringFormat();
            watermarkFormat.Alignment = StringAlignment.Center; //Align text in center of image

            oGraphics.DrawString("Copyright",
                watermarkFont,
                semiTransBrush,
                new PointF(imageWidth / 2, imageHeight / 2), watermarkFormat);

            //Dispose of graphic objects
            imagePhoto.Dispose();
            oGraphics.Dispose();

            //Output image
            oBitmap.Save(context.Response.OutputStream, ImageFormat.Jpeg);
        }
        else
        {
        }

    }

    public bool IsReusable
    {
        get
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
}

You can see that I am manipulating my image based on the query string parameters I pass from my .NET page into my Generic Handler. Hopefully, my code is commented well enough to explain the general overview on what is going on.

The following code displays how my aspx page parses all the parameters needed to generate an image on the page:

Default.aspx

<%@ Page Language="C#" AutoEventWireup="true" CodeFile="Default.aspx.cs" Inherits="_Default" %>

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head runat="server">
    <title>Image Generator</title>
</head>
<body>
    <form id="form1" runat="server">
    <div>
        Select an Image:
        <asp:DropDownList ID="ddlImage" runat="server">
            <asp:ListItem Text="*" Value="*">Select Image</asp:ListItem>
            <asp:ListItem Text="The Tumbler" Value="C:\Users\Surinder\Documents\Visual Studio 2010\WebSites\ImageCreator\Images\batmobile_Tumbler.jpg"></asp:ListItem>
            <asp:ListItem Text="Audi TT" Value="C:\Users\Surinder\Documents\Visual Studio 2010\WebSites\ImageCreator\Images\new-audi-tt-coupe.jpg"></asp:ListItem>
            <asp:ListItem Text="Volvo Concept" Value="C:\Users\Surinder\Documents\Visual Studio 2010\WebSites\ImageCreator\Images\volvo-s60-concept-interior1.jpg"></asp:ListItem>
        </asp:DropDownList>
        <br />
        <br />
        Add Logo: <asp:TextBox ID="txtImage" runat="server"></asp:TextBox>
        <br />
        <br />
        Add a comment:
        <asp:TextBox ID="txtComment" runat="server" TextMode="MultiLine" Width="500" Height="50"></asp:TextBox>
        <br />
        <br />
        <asp:Button ID="btnCreateImage" Text="Create Image" runat="server" onclick="btnCreateImage_Click" />
        <br />
        <br />
        <img id="imgRender" alt="Image Render" title="Image Render" runat="server" />        
    </div>
    </form>
</body>
</html>

Default.aspx.cs

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Web;
using System.Web.UI;
using System.Web.UI.WebControls;

public partial class _Default : System.Web.UI.Page 
{
    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (ddlImage.SelectedValue == "*")
        {
            imgRender.Visible = false;
        }
        else
        {
            imgRender.Visible = true;
        }
    }

    protected void btnCreateImage_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (ddlImage.SelectedValue != "*")
        {
            //The Image source will be pointed to our Generic Handler to display the image.
            imgRender.Src = String.Format("ImageRenderJpeg.ashx?ImageUrl={0}&ImageComment={1}&Icon={2}", ddlImage.SelectedValue, txtComment.Text, txtImage.Text);
        }
    }
}

Making Calculations In LINQ

I am currently working on an ASP.NET 4.0  e-commerce site using Entity Framework alongside LINQ. I came across a small issue when I needed to carry out some calculations based on product pricing and the discounts that would need to be applied based on a specific customers allowance.

You maybe thinking, what’s the issue? Well I wanted to be able to make the calculations within my LINQ query since both product pricing and customer discount amounts are stored in the database. So initially wrote the following code:

using (MyEntities myContext = new MyEntities())
{
    int productPrice = (from p in myContext.Products
                        where p.ProductID == 1
                        select p.Price).SingleOrDefault(); 
 
    int customerDiscount = (from cd in myContext.CustomerDiscounts
                            where cd.CustomerID == 15
                            select cd.Discount).SingleOrDefault(); 
 
    int productDiscountedPrice = productPrice - ((productPrice * customerDiscount) / 100);
}

As you can see from my code above, I had to write two separate LINQ queries in order to get the values I wanted and then base my calculations on those values. But I was determined to carry out my calculations in one query. Luckily, LINQ has has a really cool keyword that I totally missed. It’s the “let” keyword which allows you to declare a variable and assign it a calculated value.

using (MyEntities myContext = new MyEntities())
{
    int productDiscount = (from cd in myContext.CustomerDiscounts
                           join p in myContext.Products on cd.ProductID equals cd.ProductID
                           where p.ProductID == 1 && cd.CustomerID == 15
                           let discountAmount = p.Price - ((p.Price * cd.Discount) / 100)
                           select discountAmount).SingleOrDefault();
}

Since my database schema allowed me to join my “CustomerDiscount” and “Products” table, I was able to join the two tables and retrieve values I required through one query.

Calling a ASP.NET Method Using jQuery

Over the last few months I have had the ability to mess around with a bit of jQuery. Even though I don’t have the complete understanding on how it works, I can see the benefits of writing my code in jQuery compared to bashing out lots of lines of JavaScript to do the same thing.

One the cool features I have used is calling one of my .NET methods using the “$.ajax” jQuery command. In my example (below), I have created two aspx pages. The code-behind of my first page  (jQueryMethodTest.aspx) will only contain a public static method called “WhatIsYourName”, which returns a string value.

[WebMethod]
public static string WhatIsYourName(string name)
{
    if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(name))
    {
        return String.Concat("Hello ", name, "!");
    }
    else
    {
        return String.Empty;
    }
}

Remember, the jQueryMethodTest.aspx page only needs to contain our method nothing else! Additional methods can be added. Just don’t add any web controls.

The second page (jQueryAjax.aspx), will contain our jQuery code and some HTML to output our result from calling the “WhatIsYourName” method.

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head runat="server">
    <title></title>
    <script type="text/javascript" language="javascript" src="javascript/jquery.js"></script>
</head>
<script type="text/javascript">
    $(document).ready(function() {
        $("#btnSubmitName").click(function(event) {
            $.ajax({
                type: "POST",
                url: "jQueryMethodTest.aspx/WhatIsYourName",
                data: "{'name': '" + $('#name').val() + "'}",
                contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
                dataType: "json",
                success: function(message) {
                    ShowPopup(message);
                },
                error: NameFailed
            });
        });
    });

    function ShowPopup(result) {
        if (result.d != "") {
            $("#Message").html(result.d);
        }
        else {
            $("#Message").html("I didn't get your name.");
        }
    }

    function NameFailed(result) {
        $("#Message").html(result.status + ' ' + result.statusText);
    }  
  </script>  

<body>
    <form id="form1" runat="server">
    <div>
        <input id="name" name="name" type="text" />
        <br />
        <input id="btnSubmitName" name="btnSubmitName" type="button" value="Submit" />
        <br /><br />
        <span id="Message" style="color:Red;"></span>
    </div>
    </form>
</body>
</html>

If all goes well, you should get the following result:

Calling ASP Method Using jQuery

The “$.ajax” jQuery command requires the following parameters in order to work:

  • url – links to where our .NET method is placed.
  • data – retrieves the value from some control in our page to pass to our method. Remember, the name of the parameter must be named the same as the parameter from our .NET method.
  • dataType – the response type.
  • contentType – the request content type.
  • success – the JavaScript function that gets fired on postback.
  • error – the Javascript function that gets fired if there is a failure. This is an optional parameter.

I guess jQuery’s motto really is true: “write less, do more”.

Dynamically Load ASP.NET UserControls

I had created some .NET UserControl’s that I needed to dynamically add to a Panel control within my page. I previously thought generating my UserControl’s dynamically would be the same as dynamically generating any other .NET Control, like this:

private void CreateControls()
{
    //Create control
    TextBox txtUser = new TextBox();
    txtUser.ID = "txtUser";
    txtUser.Text = "Please enter a value";
 
    //Add Control to Panel already in our .NET page
    pnlControlPlaceHolder.Controls.Add(txtUser);
}

But I was wrong! :-)

Fortunately, there is a really easy way to to add a UserControl dynamically by simply making use of the “LoadControl” method. The “LoadControl” method takes a single parameter containing the virtual path of your UserControl. For example:

private void CreateControls()
{
    //Create control
    Control myUserControl = LoadControl("MyUserControl.ascx") as MyUserControl;
    myUserControl.ID = "ucMyControl";
 
    //Add Control to Panel already in our .NET page
    pnlControlPlaceHolder.Controls.Add(myUserControl);
}

Easy!