Changing EXIF Date and Time In Raw Files

My Fujifilm X100F camera only comes out of hibernation when I go on holiday. Most of the time, I fail to ensure my camera settings are correct before I take the very first snap. This happened on my last holiday to Loch Lomond.

When it came to the job of carrying out some image processing from RAW to JPEG, I noticed all of my photos EXIF dates were incorrect. I am such stickler for correct EXIF information, including geolocation wherever possible. EXIF information is so useful for cataloging when consumed by photo applications, whether it’s on my Synology or uploaded to Google Photos.

Due to the high number of photos with incorrect date stamps, I needed a tool that will automate the correction process. After a bit of Googling, I found an application called exiftool by Phil Harvey that allows the EXIF date/time stamp to be modified using a method in the documentation called “Shift”.

The exiftool has no GUI (graphical user interface) and will need to be run in Terminal on a Mac or command line for Windows users. The command to use is relatively simple and the only complex thing you will have to do is calculate how many days, months, years, hours, minutes and seconds you need to add or subtract.

In my case, the calculation was a matter of subtracting 3 days from all the photos and the command to do this looks like the following:

exiftool -AllDates-='0:0:3 0:0:0' -m /Volumes/LochLomond

Lets breakdown the command to get a better understanding what each part does.

  • exiftool: Runs the application and you have to ensure that your Terminal/Command Line is run in the same directory exiftool is housed.
  • AllDates: Modifies all dates in a photo.
  • -=‘0:0:3 0:0:0’: Subtract 3 days off the photos exif date. If you wanted to add 3 days, use “+=” instead. The date time format is presented as “<year>:<month>:<day> <hours>:<minute>:<second>”.
  • -m: Ignore minor errors and warnings (as stated in the documentation).
  • /Volumes/LochLomond: Location to where all the photos reside.

When making mass changes to files, it’s always recommended to ensure you have a back up of all photos for you too fallback on if you accidentally mess up the EXIF update.

Kentico 12 MVC: Get List of Widgets Used On A Page

There are times when you need to know what widgets are being used on a page. In my case, I needed to know this information to render JavaScript code at the bottom of the page that each of my widgets depends on.

Why don't I just place all the JavaScript code my site and widgets use in one file? Loading one large JavaScript file isn't the best approach for page performance. Instead, I use LabJS to dynamically load scripts in specific execution order without blocking other resources. So if I created a Carousel widget in Kentico, I would only load the JavaScript plugin if added to the page.

I'll use my JavaScript scenario as a basis for demonstrating the way to list out widgets used in a page.

If we delve into the CMS_Document table, Kentico uses the "DocumentPageBuilderWidgets" field that stores a JSON structure consisting of a list of all the widgets and their property values. All we are interested in is the type property.

Let's get to the code.

Controller - SharedController

I created a SharedController class containing a GenerateWidgetJavascript() PartialViewResult. This will convert the JSON from the "DocumentPageBuilderWidgets" field into a JSON Object to then be queried (using SelectTokens) to select every iteration of the type field in the hierarchy.

/// <summary>
/// Get widget used on a page to render any required JavaScript.
/// </summary>
/// <returns></returns>
public PartialViewResult GenerateWidgetJavascript()
{
    List<string> widgetTypes = new List<string>();

    if (Page.GetStringValue("DocumentPageBuilderWidgets", string.Empty) != string.Empty)
    {
        JObject pageWidgetJson = JObject.Parse(Page.GetStringValue("DocumentPageBuilderWidgets", string.Empty));

        if (pageWidgetJson != null)
            widgetTypes = pageWidgetJson.SelectTokens("$.editableAreas[*].sections[*].zones[*].widgets[*].type").Select(jt => jt.ToString().Substring(jt.ToString().LastIndexOf('.') + 1)).Distinct().ToList();
    }

    return PartialView("Widgets/_PageWidgetJs", widgetTypes);
}

Additional manipulation is carried out on the type field using LINQ to return a distinct set of results, as there might be a case where the same widget is used multiple times on a page. Since I name all my widgets in the following format - <SiteName>.<WidgetGroup>.<WidgetName>, I am only interested in the <WidgetName>. For example, my widget would be called "SurinderSite.Layout.Carousel". The controller will simply output "Carousel".

To avoid confusion in my code snippet, it's worth noting I use a Page variable. This contains information about the current page and is populated in my base controller. It has a type of TreeNode. You can see my approach to getting the current page information in this post.

Partial View - _PageWidgets

The most suitable place to add my widget dependent JavaScript is in the /View/Shared/Widgets directory - part of the recommended Kentico project structure.

All we need to do in the view is iterate through the string collection of widget types and have a bunch of if-conditions to render the necessary JavaScript.

@model List<string>

@if (Model.Any())
{
    <script>
        @foreach (string widgetType in Model)
        {
            if (widgetType == "Carousel")
            {
                <text>
                    $LAB
                        .script("/resources/js/plugins/slick.min.js")
                        .script("/resources/js/carousel.min.js").wait(function () {
                            {
                                FECarousel.Init();
                            }
                        });
                </text>
            }
        }
    </script>
}

Layout View

The Layout view will be the best place to add the reference to our controller in the following way:

@{ Html.RenderAction("GenerateWidgetJavascript", "Shared"); }